Unsolved Mysteries: The Invaders – “Night Ride” b/w “Invaders Twist” (Pacer, 1962)

(Image source: Discogs)

As always, if you can help shed light on our Unsolved Mysteries, please do! Any information is very much appreciated — please leave it in the comments section, and I will update the post, with credit, accordingly.

[See the end of this article for an exciting update!]

While listening to Fool’s Paradise, a rockabilly, surf, and rock & roll show on WFMU, I heard a thrilling instrumental surf track called “Night Ride” by an act called The Invaders. The band appears to be a trio — drums, bass, and guitar. A simple but momentous bass line incites matters, after which a wave of amateurish but rollicking drums sets an off-kilter pace, while a fluctuating guitar line brings the treble.

According to Discogs, this was put out in 1962 on a local, one-off record label named Pacer, based in a small city in Ohio named Delaware. The writing credits were Balogh, Iver, and May.

“Night Ride” and, in one case, its b-side, “Invaders Twist,” have appeared on a handful of compilations of obscure rock and roll singles over the years, released on specialist labels with titles like Realllll Rrrrrockin’ and Rare Rockers From Small 1950’s Labels Vol. 3 and, my favourite, The Best Of Greasy Rock ‘N’ Roll Volume 6. But no information survives about the band itself.

Greasy! (Image source: Discogs)

I did some digging. There is a Pacer Inn and Suites Motel in Delaware, which matches the record label. Unfortunately, all three names listed as writer credits are common ones, so Google searching those names in conjunction with “Delaware Ohio” and “Ohio” is of limited utility.

Eventually, I reached out to the Facebook page of Endangered Species, a Delaware OH shop that bills itself as “The Last Record Store On Earth.” Stephen from the store responded quickly, letting me that they get a copy into the shop every once in awhile. He clarified that the term “Pacer” has special significance in Delaware. “We are the home of The Little Brown Jug horse race and the horses are called ‘pacers,'” he explained. “It is the team name for the local high school as well, The Delaware Hayes Pacers.”

108 Spring St., Delaware, OH, circa Aug 2012, according to Google Maps. This is the address listed as the Pacer record label HQ on the “Night Ride” single. A pesky tree obscures our view.

Stephen told me he’s worked in the shop for forty years, but has never been able to clarify the origin of the single, suspecting it was self-produced and self-financed by some “local teens.” “We get a copy in now and then and if in nice shape, sell it for $2.99.” Considering copies have sold for $66 on Discogs, that’s quite a steal!

If you can shed light on the mystery, please do! Include any relevant information in the Comments section and I will update this listing, with proper credit provided.

UPDATE! July 20, 2020: Mystery Solved!

David May, one third of the Invaders, left a comment on this very page (see below) and connected with me via email to fill me in on the Invaders story!

May now lives in Brentwood, Tennessee, but he grew up in Delaware, Ohio. He started the Invaders in fall of 1961 after meeting a new friend, Tom Ivers. They were both in high school. “We played as a duo for a time and used the name The Invaders, boasting ‘rock-it to the music that’s out of this world!’ After a few weeks our ambition grew and we found a drummer named Greg Balogh – at a different high school – and we became a trio doing instrumentals. We were the only band we knew about in the area and were invited to play at lots of local events and parties. We did have a few original compositions and decided we should make a record. Greg’s grandfather owned a local recreation area named Eckels Lake and he offered to underwrite our recording session.”

They were managed by Rick Scarry, who had recently graduated from their high school, and who was working as a radio DJ. “He had connections with radio and TV people in Columbus and one, Jerry Beck, knew his way around the recording studio and distribution channels.

“We did our recording session at Coronet Records in Columbus and 500 copies were pressed at Columbia Records in Chicago. The records were placed in local record shops in central Ohio and in juke boxes. Local radio stations played it quite a bit in April, 1962 and we often joined disc jockeys at sock hops they hosted all over central Ohio. We were featured guest recording artists! Our band’s lifespan was fairly short, however, as I left town in the fall for college in Kentucky.  We may have reconvened a time or two after that, but I never went back to Delaware once I was in college.

“The Pacer Records label was inspired by the harness racing theme that was a big deal in Delaware.  One of the triple crown races of harness racing, The Little Brown Jug, was held every September in Delaware. Our high school mascot was a pacer. Thus, Pacer Records. The address on the record label was the home address of Rick Scarry, our manager.

“Rick left Delaware himself a few years later and became a very popular radio personality in Los Angeles during the 70’s and 80’s. Following that, he embarked on a successful career in movies, television, and commercials. He is still active in that industry today. I have been in contact with Rick over the past few years, and most recently about these findings, and he is as surprised as I am.”

The story of how May came across this blog post is its own story. “I have been playing guitar since the late 1950’s and focus mainly on instrumentalists from the late fifties and early sixties,” May says. “I am constantly looking for new things to learn to play from that era. I search eBay for ‘rockin’ guitar instrumentals’ once or twice a year. A search I made in April led me to an album titled Guitar Runaway and as I scanned the track listings my eyes settled on track seven, side one, by The Invaders. It was titled ‘Invader’ (not ‘Invader Twist’ – the true title) but the writer credits were the names of our band members. I was stunned by this finding because it never, ever entered my mind that our recording would ever get out of central Ohio and certainly wouldn’t have acquired any interest from collectors or record manufacturers.

“I also found out at that same time that both sides were actually posted to YouTube. I messaged the person who posted ‘Night Ride’ about how he was able to post it to YouTube and he revealed to me that the song was found on an album, Rare Rockers From Small 50’s Labels. He furnished me the link to Discogs, which listed that album. From that link I was able to make the discovery of all six of the compilations that contain one or the other side of our recording. That was my initial exposure to Discogs. There are currently 36 of the various albums containing our record for sale by Discogs members. The sellers are all over the world. I am just absolutely astonished by these findings, and quite enthusiastic to say the least. I have had contact with several Discogs members in the past week about the record.  One man in Belgium paid $167 for his copy of it.

“I was directed to the article in your website by another member of Discogs community. He owns a copy of our record and was identified on the website as an owner. I messaged him asking how he came to acquire the record, and he shared a lot of interesting information with me in his reply. He first heard the recording on the same radio show you mention in your article. He even shared with me playlists for the several dates on which he heard our record played!  He put in a saved search on eBay for the record and finally after three years waiting a copy came up for bid which he acquired in 2017.

“In his delightful message of reply to my inquiry he sent me the link to your article about our record in Anomaly Index, May, 2020. I can’t tell you just how excited I was to read what you had to say and to have the opportunity to provide the information you were seeking about the band and the record.

“Today I called the owner of the record store, Endangered Species, in Delaware, Ohio, that you had communicated with. I shared information with him about the band and about the members. We had a wonderful conversation, and he recalled communicating with you about it.”

May updated me on his pursuits and the whereabouts of the former Invaders. “I know that Tom Ivers, the other guitarist, has deceased some few years ago. I have been unable to locate Greg Balogh, the drummer, but have information that as recently as two to three years ago he still lived in Delaware. I asked Patrick Bailey, the record store owner, to help me trace down Greg, if possible, so there’s a chance I might still find him. I know he will be or would have been delighted to hear how our little self-financed record has achieved a world-wide following (sort of!).

“After college, I enjoyed a 34-year career with Southern Bell/BellSouth telecommunications company, retiring in 2000. I took a hiatus from playing for several years but resumed in the late 1980’s when my oldest son became interested in playing guitar. I have been spending lots of time playing ever since. I also have a nice collection of guitars and amplifiers. Nothing really valuable, just for variety’s sake. I have a good friend that plays drums and we have played gigs for several years identifying ourselves as The Elderly Brothers. My oldest son plays bass guitar with us quite often. We play exclusively music of our teenage years, 1956-64. Keeping the beat alive, so to speak.”

May expresses gratitude for the interest in his decades-old record. “This experience of the last couple months has really elevated the spirits of this old man!! 58 years after our record’s release into obscurity.”

Thanks to David May for the interview and for the images.

One thought on “Unsolved Mysteries: The Invaders – “Night Ride” b/w “Invaders Twist” (Pacer, 1962)”

  1. I am David May and I was the leader and lead guitarist of The Invaders from Delaware, Ohio, who in 1962 recorded and released “Night Ride” and “Invader Twist” on the Pacer Records label. I was surprised, and pleased, to have received a referral to this article and I am happy to provide information about our band and the recording.

    The Invaders was a three-man instrumental band formed during my senior year of high school in 1961-62. I had just relocated to Delaware, Ohio in the summer of 1961 from northern Kentucky. After the start of the school year, I met a new classmate, Tom Ivers, who was also a guitar player and we began having practice sessions together. I played a Gibson Les Paul Junior guitar. I don’t remember what model guitar Tom played, but it was also a solid-body Gibson electric.
    After several weeks or perhaps months we decided to find a drummer to join us and were referred to a young man, a terrific drummer, named Greg Balogh from a different high school. He joined us and we named our combo The Invaders. We played some parties and performed at sock hops in our community.
    In early spring 1962 we decided to make a record of a couple songs we developed. We asked a young man named Rick Scarry who had graduated from our high school the year before to help us with this project. He worked at the local radio station and was a real go-getter kind of guy. He set up the recording session at Coronet Records in Columbus, Ohio. We played as a group in the studio and the finished product was obtained in just a few takes. I don’t remember the number of takes, but we were limited in the amount of session time we had available to us! The master was sent off to Columbia Records in Chicago where 500 copies were pressed. The Pacer label was our own label.
    Rick acted as our manager and arranged many public appearances all over central Ohio after the release of the record and also was instrumental in having our record played on radio stations in central Ohio. One Columbus station named the record its Pick Hit of the Week in April, 1962. Several central Ohio record stores stocked copies of the record for sale.
    Rick Scarry eventually became a well-known radio personality in Los Angeles during the 1970’s and 80’s. Then he became a very busy actor appearing in dozens of motion pictures, commercials, and television shows. His acting career is continuing even now.

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